Friday, September 21, 2012

Where is Otzi?

It is time to search for Otzi. Today, you will be joining me as I enter the Alps in search for Otzi the Iceman. Otzi, who happens to be the oldest body ever found, is an extremely important "artifact" because he can teach us so much about what life was like when he roamed the Earth. We can study his weapons, tools, and clothing. We can also study his bones to get an idea of what people looked like. Otzi is truely an amazing discovery. However, today, you will watch as I search for Otzi and discover all the artifacts that were found with his body. The story of Otzi doesn't end there, however, because Otzi the Iceman did not die of natural causes. Was he murdered? Did he die in battle? Was he sick? You will read the evidence and try to solve the oldest mystery in the world.

Task #1: Using the Otzi PowerPoint, fill out your guided notes in your Otzi Packet. This will be done together, but you can follow along on your own screen.

Task #2: Watch the Video "Discoverying Otzi" and watch as the body and artifacts are discovered. In your Otzi packet, record all the artifacts found and why they are important.

Task #3: Sketch a scene of the area in which Otzi was discovered in. Try to place the items in the correct spot based on where they were found.


1carterl said...

The topic that I chose was not a theory so I picked theory #2 These taxa are representative of two hominid adaptive radiations, termed terrestrial and aquatic, which exhibited different habitat preferences but similar tolerances to climatic factors. Their response to changing ecological conditions was predicated upon their ability to extend their societies in space and time. We examine this difference further using a database of all available radiocarbon determinations from western Europe in the late glacial. These data act as proxies for population history, and in particular the expansion and contraction of regional populations as climate changed rapidly. Independent assessment of these processes is obtained from the genetic history of Europeans. The results indicate that climate affects population contraction rather than expansion. We discuss the consequences for genetic and cultural diversity which led to the legacy of the Ice Age: a single hominid species, globally distributed. Listen I left the papers I needed at school so can I at least please get partial credit?

4jenessa s said...

Hahaha "Otiz" ran away

9SydneyR said...

Otzi's aliiiiiiiive!!!!!! Maybe we should have Otzi try some chocolate. Otzi will looooooove it!

9SydneyR said...

Otzi's aliiiiiiiive!!!!!! Maybe we should have Otzi try some chocolate. Otzi will looooooove it!

Anonymous said...

I'm learning bout otzi in science class the hw of otzi is hard help